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Say goodbye to Phoenix — and the American West
The Colorado River powers cities across Arizona. But with temperatures rising, how long will the water hold out? ----- By William deBuys -- Salon, July 30, 2013 -- [This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch.]
Located in News
from SRLCC Feb. 2015 Newsletter
Located in Library / Inbox
USDA kicks off webinar series on drought and water challenges
The USDA Office of Sustainability and Climate Change posted a 2-hour introduction to upcoming opportunities related to drought and water challenges. The aim is to engage Forest Service employees and partners in planning for and adapting to the impacts of drought and other water challenges in the face of a changing climate.
Located in Library / News and Events Inbox
O'Donnell, Frances C., 2016. ERI Working Paper No. 37. Ecological Restoration Institute and the Southwest Fire Science Consortium, Northern Arizona University, November 2016
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New Mexico Water Dialogue 21st Annual Statewide Meeting
New Mexico has suffered through years of extreme drought, followed by a summer of greater but uneven rains—not enough, however, to equal average annual rainfall, or to replenish storage. El Niño, recently thought to be strengthening, remains weak. Updating regional water plans that were completed between 1999 and 2008 is now underway. The basic challenge remains the same: to close the gap between supply and demand. But with drought, warming, and greater unpredictability as the likely "new normal," it may be that there will just be less water to meet aggregate demand. If so, New Mexicans will need to identify the associated economic, environmental, social and cultural vulnerabilities and learn together how to live with less water.
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DroughtView: Combining on-the-ground know-how with remotely sensed data to assess drought impacts
Webinar presented by Jeremy Weiss, Climate and Geospatial Extension Scientist at the University of Arizona, and hosted by the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative.
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Researchers Look at Water Leasing Project as Possible Option for State Water Issues
With drought becoming more and more evident in the Land of Enchantment, water users and managers in New Mexico might have some tough decisions to make in the future without any help from Mother Nature. As long term drought persists and water supplies tighten, policymakers in New Mexico might have to think creatively to find flexibility when it comes to satisfying the thirsty needs of the state.
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New federal study indicates less available water for New Mexico
Rising temperatures prompted by climate change will bring about increasing difficulty for New Mexico to meet its legal obligation to deliver water to downstream neighbors in the years ahead, according to a new federal study developed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and Sandia National Laboratory.
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Dramatic water changes coming for the Southwest
Water’s future is not bright, dire warning issued. Aug. 13, 2013 Logan Hawkes
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File Octet Stream Map1 Priority Project Area Watershed Map (March 2015 )
Map 1: March 2015 Priority Project Area Watershed map shows the group's current Priority Project Area with Watershed HUC 8 (labeled), HUC 10 (not labeled), HUC 12 (labeled), Surface ownership (corrected version by Gila NF); Gila NF Priority Landscape, Grant Co 911 Roads layer; Tiger 2010 surface water (streams and waterbodies), GNIS Populated places, Shaded Relief image beneath all; some place names are labeled. 24"x 36" (D size), landscape, pdf
Located in Groups / Grant County Eco-Watershed Planning Group / Public Folder
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