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This final report uses biological data collected in wadeable rivers and streams, by four states, to examine the components of state and tribal bioassessment and biomonitoring programs that may be vulnerable to climate change. The study investigates the potential to identify biological response signals to climate change within existing bioassessment data sets; analyzes how biological responses can be categorized and interpreted; and assesses how they may influence decision-making processes. The analyses suggest that several biological indicators may be used to detect climate change effects and such indicators can be used by state bioassessment programs to document changes at high-quality reference sites.
Located in Library
File object code David Gutzler (panel 1) audio
.WMA file of his panel presentation
Located in Library / Dialogue's 21st Annual Statewide Meeting - Jan. 8, 2015
File PDF document Why Climate Change Makes Riparian Restoration More Important Than Ever: Recommendations for Practice and Research
Seavy, Nathaniel E. et al. 2009. Why Climate Change Makes Riparian Restoration More Important Than Ever: Recommendations for Practice and Research. Ecological Restoration 27:3. September 2009
Located in Library / General Library Holdings
The CCRC is developing an educational program to provide accessible information on climate change. Three comprehensive education modules are being created using curriculum developed by the Forest Service.
Located in Library / Inbox
File PDF document Karuk Tribe: Integrating Traditional Ecological Knowledge within Natural Resource Management
In 2010, the Karuk Tribe released a draft Eco-Cultural Resources Management Plan to create a long-term adaptation strategy for the protection, enhancement and utilization of cultural and natural resources. The Eco-Cultural Resources Management Plan establishes a framework for considering a wide range of human and environmental stressors to the Karuk Tribe, including climate change.
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File PDF document Siletz Tribal Energy Program
The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, located on the Oregon coast, have created an innovative renewable energy program. The Siletz Tribal Planning Department created the Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP) through a grant from the Administration for Native Americans in 2009. Much of their work is focused on improving tribal buildings and homes. STEP prioritizes community involvement as a way to increase awareness of tribal members, promote skills-training in the tribal community and promote tribal independence in energy.
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Native Americans Have Front Line Seats to Climate Change Show
Article discusses some of the impacts of climate change on tribes.
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File PDF document Study on Megafires as unusual in long-term
Unprecedented study relies on more than 1,500 years of tree-ring data and hundreds of years of fire-scar records gathered from Ponderosa Pine forests.
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Unprecedented study relies on more than 1,500 years of tree-ring data and hundreds of years of fire-scar records gathered from Ponderosa Pine forests
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Webinar presentation by Laurie Huckaby, USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station. Hosted by the Southern Rocky Mountain Ecoregion (SRME) Consortium on 2/16/11.
Located in Library / General Library Holdings