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USDA kicks off webinar series on drought and water challenges
The USDA Office of Sustainability and Climate Change posted a 2-hour introduction to upcoming opportunities related to drought and water challenges. The aim is to engage Forest Service employees and partners in planning for and adapting to the impacts of drought and other water challenges in the face of a changing climate.
Located in Library / News and Events Inbox
O'Donnell, Frances C., 2016. ERI Working Paper No. 37. Ecological Restoration Institute and the Southwest Fire Science Consortium, Northern Arizona University, November 2016
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Video of site visits with researchers who have been studying how forests and wildlife respond to high severity burns. July 2016. Southwest fire Science Consortium
Located in Library / Inbox
File At the Nexus of Fire, Water and Society
Opinion piece. May 23, 2016. Philosophical Transactions Royal Society of London B 371: 20150172. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0172
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File TVWC Landscape Restoration Strategy
This Landscape Restoration Strategy (LRS) was developed over seven months during 2014-2015 by the Taos Valley Watershed Coalition (TVWC). Coalition members manage or provide land use consultation on all of the adjoining jurisdictions within our focus area, which extends from the Rio Grande del Rancho on the south to the San Cristobal drainage on the north and also includes the Rio Fernando, Rio Pueblo, Rio Lucero, Rio Arroyo Seco, and Rio Hondo stream systems. Coalition members agree to focus on the goals of protecting, improving, and restoring the water quality, quantity, and ecological function of the forests and streams in the Rio Grande watershed within Taos County, to the benefit of both local and downstream water users. This LRS was developed by our membership to document our shared understanding of scientific data and community values, and to guide coordinated actions within our local watersheds.
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An unprecedented 40-year experiment in a 40,000 acre valley of Yosemite National Park strongly supports the idea that managing fire, rather than suppressing it, makes wilderness areas more resilient to fire, with the added benefit of increased water availability and resistance to drought. After a three-year assessment of the Park's Illilouette Creek Basin, UC Berkeley researchers concluded that a strategy dating to 1973 of managing wildfires with minimal suppression and almost no prescribed burns has created a landscape more resistant to catastrophic fire, with more diverse vegetation, forest structure and increased water storage. "When fire is not suppressed, you get all these benefits: increased stream flow, increased downstream water availability, increased soil moisture, which improves habitat for the plants in the watershed. And it increases the drought resistance of the remaining trees and also increases the fire resilience because you have created these natural firebreaks," said Gabrielle Boisramé, graduate student at UC Berkeley's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and first author of the study. The Cohesive Wildland Fire Strategy supports management of fires where possible. Managing fires is part of the Cohesive Strategy vision: to safely and effectively suppress fires, use fire where allowable, manage our natural resources, and as a Nation, live with wildland fire. Read the full article and find the published study at: ttp://wildfireinthewest.blogspot.com/2016/10/wildfire-management-vs-suppression.html.
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File image/x-icon Models, Maps and Meetings: Using Science to Guide CS Implementation in Northern New Mexico
Presentation to the Cohesive Strategy Science Workshop in Reno, Nevada on April 26, 2017
Located in Groups / Greater Santa Fe Fireshed Coalition / Documents for Public Viewing
RMRS-GTR-310. USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station. Abstract: Ponderosa pine and dry mixed-conifer forests in the Southwest United States are experiencing, or have become increasingly susceptible to, large-scale severe wildfire, insect, and disease episodes resulting in altered plant and animal demographics, reduced productivity and biodiversity, and impaired ecosystem processes and functions. We present a management framework based on a synthesis of science on forest ecology and management, reference conditions, and lessons learned during implementations of our restoration framework. Our framework focuses on the restoration of key elements similar to the historical composition and structure of vegetation in these forests: (1) species composition; (2) groups of trees; (3) scattered individual trees; (4) grass-forb-shrub interspaces; (5) snags, logs, and woody debris; and (6) variation in the arrangements of these elements in space and time. Our framework informs management strategies that can improve the resiliency of frequent-fire forests and facilitate the resumption of characteristic ecosystem processes and functions by restoring the composition, structure, and spatial patterns of vegetation. We believe restoration of key compositional and structural elements on a per-site basis will restore resiliency of frequent-fire forests in the Southwest, and thereby position them to better resist, and adapt to, future disturbances and climates.
Located in Groups / Forest and Watershed Health Coordinating Group / Public Collaborative Group Folder
File Dagmar Llewellyn - Panel: RWP Emerging Issues [Role of Bureau of Reclamation]
Audio file
Located in Library / 22nd Annual Statewide Meeting - Planning: How Can It Make a Difference?